News

Glaciers in Iceland continue to retreat - 20.4.2018

The mass balance of the Icelandic glaciers has been negative since 1995 with the exception of the year 2015 when it became positive for the first time in 20 years. The mass balance in 2016 was again negative by a similar magnitude as in recent years. The mass balance of Langjökull and Hofsjökull

was again negative in 2017 whereas Vatnajökull was almost in balance. The glaciers have lost approximately 250 km3 of ice since 1995, which corresponds to ca. 7% of their total volume. Glaciers in Iceland have retreated rapidly for more than two decades and glacier downwasting is one

of the most obvious consequences of a warming climate in the country.

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mynd

EUROVOLC – a networking project kick-off meeting - 26.2.2018

A group of more than 70 Earth and atmospheric scientists from 9 European countries met earlier this month in Keflavik to start their collaboration on the Horizon2020 Infrastructure project EUROVOLC. The group represents 18 partners comprising volcano research and monitoring institutions, civil protection and companies from the IT and geothermal industry.

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mynd

The weather in Iceland in 2017 - 23.2.2018

The year 2017 was warm in Iceland and the weather was mainly favourable. February, May, September and October were particularly warm. The East had unusually much precipitation. Heavy rainfall in the East and Southeast at the end of September resulted in extensive flooding from major rivers in the area. The last two months of the year were considerably cooler than the previous months. November was cold and the last days of December were the coldest days of the year. Wind speed was slighly lower than average. 

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kort

Seismic swarm east of Grímsey on the decline - 23.2.2018

The seismic swarm east of Grímsey has been on the decline for the last days. Substantial seismic activity is however still ongoing with small swarms occurring, including up to magnitude M3 earthquakes. This night, February 23, two magnitude M2.8 earthquakes where detected about 13 km north of Grímsey.

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mynd

Gas concentrations in the Hofsjökull ice cave - 21.2.2018

The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) warns of the dangers of gas pollution and roof collapse in a recently discovered ice cave in Blágnípujökull, a SW outlet glacier from the Hofsjökull ice cap in Central Iceland. Read more
mynd

Seismic swarm near Grímsey: update 15:00, 19 February - 19.2.2018

At 05:38 UTC this morning an earthquake of magnitude M5.2 occurred 14 km ENE of Grímsey. It was felt widely in the Northern part of the country. Five more earthquakes were detected. The earthquakes originate from the so-called Grímsey oblique rift zone in the northern Skálfandadjúp basin within the Tjörnes fracture zone.

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mynd

Grímsey earthquake swarm - 16.2.2018

Earthquake swarms are happening frequently in the vicinity of Grímsey. An earthquake swarm about 10-12 km North-East of Grímsey started on February 14. As of noon on February 16, over 1000 earthquakes have been detected

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ljósmynd

Ice cave in Hofsjökull – a warning - 15.2.2018

Ice caves are often found at glacier edges in Iceland, formed either by meltwater flow beneath the ice or by geothermal activity. News has recently been shared about a newly discovered ice cave in Blágnípujökull, where a child has collapsed due to breathing in toxic gases. The cave should not be entered without gas monitoring instruments.

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kort

Earthquake 3.6 in the caldera of Öræfajökull - 9.2.2018

On the 9th February 2018 at 05:07, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 occurred within the caldera of Öræfajökull volcano. Around 10 aftershocks have been recorded. The earthquake was felt by few people in the area, however most people slept through it.

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Photo

IMO's Involvement in WMO's Global Cryosphere Watch - 25.1.2018

Three years ago, the World Meteorological Organization approved the implementation of the Global Cryosphere Watch as a cross-cutting mechanism to bring together international observations and research of the world's cryosphere. Its data products and services are intended to support scientific progress and environmental policy developments related to the cryosphere, including snow cover, glaciers, ice caps, permafrost, sea ice, freshwater ice and icebergs around the globe.

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Final estimates of the emissions from the Holuhraun eruption based on ground-based measurements - 22.1.2018

A new paper published last week in Geosciences reports that the Holuhraun eruption released the most SO2 (sulfur dioxide) of any effusive (non-explosive) eruption in the world on an annual basis since 1978, the advent of satellite monitoring of volcanic eruption clouds. The Holuhraun eruption released 16 times more SO2 (sulfur dioxide, 9.6 Mt) and almost twice as much CO2 (carbon dioxide, 5.1 Mt) as one year´s worth of anthropogenic emissions within Iceland (0.06 Mt SO2 and 3 Mt CO2 in 2015).  Read more






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