Home-page - Icelandic Meteorological Office

Weather forecast

Weather forecast for the next 24 hours

Southeast 3-10 m/s in the south and west parts and light rain or sleet, increased precipitation in the afternoon. Light wind and dry in North- and East-Iceland, but becoming cloudy late afternoon with sleet or snow, and northeast 8-15 there in the evening. Temperature 1 to 6 deg. C, but around freezing in the north and east.

Southeast 8-13 tomorrow in the south and west parts with light rain or sleet, temperature 0 to 5 deg. C. Lighter wind in North- and East-Iceland, mostly fair and frost 0 to 5 deg. C.

Forecast made 02.03.2021 05:00

Precipitation Temperature Wind

Forecast for station - 1

Forecast for station - 2

Forecast for station - 3

Forecast for station - 4

Forecast for station - 5

Whole country

News

Earthquake swarm in Reykjanes peninsula - 26.2.2021

On February 24th 2021, two earthquakes above magnitude M5 were recorded. The larger one, M5.7,  was at 10:05 and at 10:30 a M5.0 was measured. Later that day at 12:37 a M4.8 was recorded. Since the beginning of this unrest 16 earthquakes above  M4 have been recorded and 90 earthquakes above M3. They have been felt widely in the SW part of the country and the larges once in the NW part as far as Ísafjörður. Note that all reviewed earthquakes have occurred on the Reykjanes Peninsula, roughly between Kleifarvatn and Svartsengi.

Read more

The weather in Iceland in 2020 - 30.1.2021

The year 2020 was stormy. The average wind speed was remarkably high and number of windy days was unusually high.

The annual mean temperature at all stations was higher than the 1961 to 1990 mean, but below the average of the last ten years. It was relatively warmer in the East and Northeast but colder in the Southwest and West.

The year was wet in the North and East. The annual precipitation in Akureyri has never been higher since the beginning of registration in 1928.


Read more

The landslide in Seyðisfjörður is the largest landslide to have damaged an urban area in Iceland - 8.1.2021

From 15 to 18 December 2020, several landslides hit the town of Seyðisfjörður, destroying or damaging more than 10 buildings. Thankfully, there were no injuries. The largest landslide occurred on 15 December, and it ranks as the most damaging landslide to have affected an urban area in Iceland.

Read more

New article on glacier changes in Iceland over the past 130 years - 7.12.2020

An article recently published in the journal Frontiers in Earth Science on glacier changes in Iceland describes changes in the volume and mass of the Icelandic glaciers since they reached historical maximum extent at the end of the so-called Little Ice Age shortly before 1900. The results of a number of studies covering about 99% of the  glacier area are summarized in the article, which is a collaborative effort of many glaciologists at several institutes that conduct measurements and research on glaciers in Iceland.

Read more

Significant ground deformation detected associated with recent earthquakes - 27.10.2020

Last week a series of earthquakes occurred on the Reykjanes Peninsula, between Fagradalsfjall and Kleifarvatn - the largest of which was a magnitude 5.6 earthquake in the vicinity of Núpshíðarháls, which occurred at 13:43 on 20th October. The maps displayed here show ground deformation associated with movement on faults during the period 16th-22nd October.

Read more

M5.6 at the Reykjanes peninsula - 27.10.2020

Seismic activity has decreased significantly in recent days. About 180 earthquakes of magnitude 2.2 or less were detected the last two days, for comparison, during the first 24 hours following the 5.6 earthquake in Núpshlíðarháls, about 1700 earthquakes were detected in the area.

Read more

Older news


Short articles

Hafís

Sea ice around Iceland

Ice in the ocean around Iceland has mostly arrived from afar.

It comes here from the Denmark strait, which connects the Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean, between Iceland and Greenland. Sometimes the ice comes directly from north to the northeast corner of Iceland, but all the ice comes from the same source: the East-Greenland current which flows from the Arctic Ocean due south along the east coast of Greenland, passing northwest Iceland.

Read more
 

Other articles






Other related web sites


This website is built with Eplica CMS