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Ísland 20. júní 2018

The weather in Iceland in 2018 - 25.1.2019

The year 2018 was wet and relatively warm. The precipitation was well above average in most parts of the country and the number of precipitation days was considerably higher than normal both in the South and in the North. The summer months were relatively cold in the southwestern part of the country compared to the last ten years while it was warm in the northeastern part. There was exceptionally little sunshine in the southwestern part of the country during the year. The number of bright sunshine hours in Reykjavík have not been as few since 1992. June and July were particularly gloomy in the South West. The last two months of the year were warm. Wind speed was close to average

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EUROVOLC is bringing the European volcanological community closer together - 16.10.2018

The European Network of Observatories and Research Infrastructures for Volcanology EUROVOLC is a H2020 Research and Innovation Project of the European Commission. It will construct an integrated and harmonized European volcanological community able to fully support, exploit and build-upon existing and emerging national and pan-European research infrastructures, including e-Infrastructures of the European Supersite volcanoes. The harmonization includes linking scientists and stakeholders and connecting still isolated volcanological infrastructures located at in situ volcano observatories (VO) and volcanological research institutions (VRIs).

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Austmannsbunga in Katla

100 years since Katla erupted - 12.10.2018

Today, 12 October, is the 100-year anniversary of the 1918 eruption of Katla. The volcano is considered one of the most hazardous of Iceland's 32 active volcanic systems. During the last 1100 years, Katla has erupted at least 21 times, with an average repose interval of around 50 years. The current one-hundred-year repose marks the longest period since a Katla eruption. The Katla volcanic system is located in the eastern volcanic zone. It is characterized by an 80-km-long fissure swarm and an ice-clad central volcano. The central volcano is covered by the Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap and it includes a 9 by 14 km caldera, with ice-thickness up to 700 m.

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Meteorologists Have Never Seen a Storm Like Irma

Cooperation is a must for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change - 26.9.2018

The consequences of this summer's weather have included droughts, heatwaves and wildfires, straining the society's capacity to cope with such perils. Most of the Nordic and Baltic countries have experienced the hottest summer on record, while the number of days with rain in parts of Iceland was exceptionally high. Was this summer just an exceptional freak event or is this due to climate change? And if this is due to climate change – what can be done?

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